Making a Saddled Chair Seat – Tools that worked well…

For some time now, I have wanted to make a chair with a saddled seat. Over time, I bought a few tools that might come in handy. A week or three ago, a friend of a friend asked me to make a couple of bar stools with saddled seats. Of course I could do it – how hard could it be?

It turns out that its not that hard, or time consuming… And it gave me an excuse to put a few tools to work in earnest…

The AEG Super Clamp

I have used the Triton equivalent – borrowed during the Jacaranda show while I was demonstrating. The AEG is probably easier to use, and rock solid. The controls allow unlocking with out the risk of getting clobbered in the shins by the foot pedal.

To hold the seats while I hollowed them out, I screwed a block onto the back of each seat, and clamped the bock in the jaws. Worked well!

Arbotech Turboplane

This was the first time I used the beast. It works well, removes wood quickly, and only has a few vices. Beware ‘climb cutting’, where the cut is with the cut of the blade – in a split second, the blade can grab, dig in, create a great divot, and, if you aren’t careful, take a divot out of you. That said, cutting against the flow (think of cutting with a router – the work moves on to the teeth), the tool is quite controllable, cuts quickly and quite smoothly on wide flat curves like the chair seat.

On the down side, the thing chucks shavings and dust all over the place – best used outside. Even so, Su complained of shavings all over the vegetables!

The Scorp

This tool was something of a revelation. I bought it a few years ago – I saw it one in Carbatec, and wasn’t expensive, so I bought it to hollow out chair seats and maybe bowls. It sat unused until this week. The edge was pretty basic, especially the inside bevel. Wet and dry around a suitable scrap worked to get the edge of the inside bevel OK, then a lick on the back with the stones, and it was sharp enough.

I had kind of expected it to work like a draw knife, but it is quite different. Instead of slicing off the waste, it shaves the surface – making tightly curled shavings. It worked well, and dressed up the rough cut surface left after the Arbotech. It did a good job of shaping the seat.

The Chairmaker’s Plane

This little HNT Gordon plane has curved bottom – curved in two axis. It is a little tricky to use – the body of the blade has to be held at the correct angle to cut, but it worked really well. One of the seats had some pretty wild grain, but the little plane didn’t care – I got no tear-out to speak of.

Like all Terry Gordon planes, this was good to go straight out of the box. The blade held its edge, and was easy to sharpen as needed.

The result…

Two stools, ready for finish… These turned out well – happy with that.

How hard can it be?

2 thoughts on “Making a Saddled Chair Seat – Tools that worked well…”

  1. Great looking chairs Alan.Well done. Robert

    On Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 12:43 pm Clarence Valley Woodworkers Association, wrote:

    > Alan J Bishop posted: ” For some time now, I have wanted to make a chair > with a saddled seat. Over time, I bought a few tools that might come in > handy. A week or three ago, a friend of a friend asked me to make a couple > of bar stools with saddled seats. Of course I could do” >

    Like

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